The first community presented in Worlds Apart is Blackwell, a coal mining region in rural Kentucky where politics and economics combine to yield unprecedented power by a controlling elite. In this analysis, there are clear cut divisions based on class and culture.
The first community presented in Worlds Apart is Blackwell, a coal mining region in rural Kentucky where politics and economics combine to yield unprecedented power by a controlling elite. In this analysis, there are clear cut divisions based on class and culture. Please use the following three questions as the basis for a discussion with your group members.Which individuals or groups are socially excluded in this community?Describe the factors that created and sustain their exclusion.What are some possible strategies for promoting inclusion?
Page 2In her book, World Aparts, Poverty and Politics in Rural America, Duncan describes the community of Dahlia, a city in the Mississippi delta where the elites domination of politics, landownership and economics has resulted in discrimination, inequality and lack of opportunity. Please use the following four questions as the basis for a discussion with your group members.Which individuals or groups are socially excluded in this community? Describe the factors that created and sustain their exclusion.What are some possible strategies for promoting inclusion?How does this community differ from Blackwell?Page 3In her book, Worlds Apart, Poverty and Politics in Rural America, Duncan describes the community of Gray Mountain, a town in rural Maine where she claims that class distinctions exist but are muted by its pervasive civic culture, public institutions and the attitudes of the corporate and business community. Please use the following four questions as the basis for a discussion with your group members.Which individuals or groups are socially excluded in this community?Describe the factors that created and sustain their exclusion.What are some possible strategies for promoting inclusion?What distinguishes this community from the community of Blackwell and Dahlia?Page 4In this discussion, please share your critical analysis of what the communities of Blackwell, Dahlia, and Gray Mountain have taught you about social exclusion and its economic, health, and political effect on individuals, families, and entire communities.As we near the end of the term, please reflect upon the course materials and discussions to identify what you see as the primary factors that perpetuate social exclusion. How might we as social workers push back on these factors to create a more just world?
source.GOOD RICH PEOPLE AND BAD POOR PEOPLE Surrounding the square is the usual small-town mixture of stores, lunch counters, florists, smoke shops, and the two banks that have been rivals since practically the turn of the centuryone of them run by an octogenarian president who knows all the families and their reputations. According to a young man just returned from Ohio, When I came back here I went over to the bank and said Id like to borrow a thousand dollars. Old man Carver, who is about a hundred years old, he comes out and he goes, Well, who are you? And I said, My names Greg Benton. And he goes, You any kin to Matthew Benton? I go, Hes my great-grandfather. And he just gave me the money. I didnt even sign a note. They just handed me a thousand dollars cash because my grandfather used to own a lot of land up here. Secondary streets, lined with parking meters whose timers are notoriously unpredictable, are crowded with furniture and appliance stores, shoe stores and barber shops, and several old hotels with their names painted high on the brick walls above the tangle of electric and telephone wires that drape from building to building. These are the stores where not too long ago an irreverent member of the elite dressed as a poor mountain woman, with old clothes and blackened teeth, and knocked on the doors seeking handouts. She found, as she suspected she would, that most of her good friends slammed the door in her face. There is an astonishing number of lawyers offices, all offering no charge for initial consultation on black-lung benefits, workers compensation, injuries, and Social Security. More than one fifth of the countys working-age population is disabled from work, and large numbers of children receive public funds because of their mental, emotional, and physical disabilities. A childs disability check can support a family down here, explains a lawyer who works these cases. Farther down Main Street, beyond the new Department of Mines offices and the old utility company, lie the sprawling welfare offices where child support and foster care are arranged and eligibility for food stamps and Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) is determined. Like the lawyers advertisements, these offices are reminders that the town will be transformed tomorrow when the first-of-the-monthers flood in from the hills and hollows to collect and spend their public assistance and disability checks. Many will also pick up prescriptions for pain and nerve pills. Old Jackson Jones has his medical practice in a small house two blocks from the square, and patients are already parking their cars up and down the street to get in line to see him. For ten dollars he will look you over and most likely write the prescription you desire. People with little money rely on him. He comes from a powerful old-line coal family, people say, and is reputed to be a fine diagnostician.

 
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